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Tour Title London Heritage Plaque Tour
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EastTownHall3.JPG Aeolian Hall This plaque reads: Completed in 1884 restored in 1969 as Aeolian Town Hall, served as a centre for political and social life in London East until 1947.   Click here to show map location
StringerHouse1.JPG Arthur Stringer House This plaque reads: Schoolboy Home of Canadian Novelist and Poet, Arthur Stringer, 1874 -1950. Author of some 45 work so fiction, including his prairie trilogy, he was also a screen-writer of note. Provincial Plaque; Street View only   Click here to show map location
BantingHouse4.JPG Banting House This plaque reads: This plaque reads: Here, in the early morning hours of October 31, 1920, Dr. Frederick Banting conceived an idea for research that led to the discovery of insulin. He believed that diabetes, then a fatal disease, could be treated by a substance extracted from a dog's atrophied pancreas. Banting was the pivotal member of the Toronto team that isolated and refined this extract, now known as insulin. In January 1922, insulin showed spectacular test results and became a lifesaving therapy worldwide Fully Accessible; Guided Tours; National Historic Site; Ontario Heritage Trust; Provincial Plaque; Site has its own Parking; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
Beechwood Historic Plaque.jpg Beechwood Historic Plaque The plaque reads: Erected in 1854 by John Birrell (1815 – 1875), merchant and later 3rd president of the Huron and Erie. Purchased 1891 by Col. William M. Gartshore (1853-1931), president of McClary’s and one-time mayor of London. Fully Accessible; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
BrickStreetCemetery2.JPG Brick Cemetery This plaque reads: this cemetery served as the burial ground for settlers who first arrived In Westminster Township in 1810. In use by 1819, it is situated on land originally granted to Peter McNames and James Sheldon. Though the farms which once surrounded it have been subdivided, the Brick Street Cemetery, now the charge of Mount Zion United Church, remains as a memorial to our pioneer ancestors.   Click here to show map location
Brick Street Methodist Church - building.jpg Brick Street Methodist Church Historic Plaque The plaque reads: Founded 1816. Present building erected 1852. Many Westminster Township pioneers are buried in adjoining cemetery, including Nathan Griffith whose brick yards gave the street its name and Phoebe McNames, a heroine of the War of 1812. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
CobaltTeletherapy1.JPG Cobalt 60-Beam Teletherapy Unit Plaque This plaque reads: In 1951 Canadian scientists, here and in Saskatoon, opened a new front in the battle against cancer. Through a pioneering partnership, the two teams of physicists, physicians and engineers, working independently yet cooperatively, designed the Saskatoon and the Eldorado (London) cobalt teletherapy units. Both became prototypes for the first commercially available units, then called "Cobalt Bombs", which allowed gamma radiation to be focussed directly on cancerous cells. Decades of effective worldwide use have proven the dependability of these units. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
EgertonSewer1.JPG Egerton Sewer Plaque This plaque reads: Egerton Street Sewer. Mayors L. Col. CMR Graham 1914 H.A. Stevenson M.D. 1915-1916. Controllers W.W. Gammage J.F. White J.M. Moore G.E.Rose. Chairman N 2 Committee Alderman A.W. Palmer. City Clerk S. Baker City Treasurer JAS S. Bell Consulting Engineer H.A. Brazier Consulting Engineers Chipman & Power Inspector A .J. Draper Contractor T.W. Nicholson Major W.N. Ashplant City Enginer Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
Engine863.JPG Engine 86 Plaque This plaque reads: Built in 1910 for the Grand Trunk Railway by the Canadian Locomotive Company of Kingston, Ontario, and weighing 135 tons Engine 86 is one of the last remaining 2-6-0 Mogul engines in Canada. This class of engine was designed specifically for branch line work. Retired by the C.N.R., it was donated to the City of London and moved to Queen’s Park in 1958. For more than a century, railways provided the links that fueled London’s economy. The first train arrived in the city in 1853, when the Great Western Railway began service from Hamilton. Lines to other cities soon followed, transforming London into the major rail centre of Southwestern Ontario. With the railway came larger, more efficient industries and greater opportunities for local entrepeneurs. In 1887, the first Canadian Pacific Railway reached London and with service extended to Western Canada, city merchants could transport goods from coast to coast. By the 1940’s over 3000 Londoners worked on the railways but in 1966 the Canadian National Railway car shops adjacent to the Western Fair grounds were closed. This combined with later reduction in service, effectively ended London’s century as a railway centre. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
First Anglican Episcopal Church.jpg First Anglican Episcopal Election Historic Plaque The plaque reads: St. Paul’s Cathedral was the site of the first election of a bishop by both clergy and laity in the world-wide Anglican Communion. On July 9, 1857, the Rev. John Strachan, Bishop of Toronto, presided over the diocesan synod which elected the Rev. Benjamin Cronyn to be the first bishop of the newly created Diocese of Huron, the eighth Canadian diocese of the Church of England.   Click here to show map location
GrosvenorLodge1.JPG Grosvenor Lodge Plaque This plaque reads: Built by Samuel Peters for his wife Anne, 1853. He was was one of London’s early surveyors and the founder of Petersville – now London West. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
HallsMills1.JPG Halls Mills Plaque This Plaque reads: From 1827 when the first mill was built, this village was the site of a pioneer industrial complex – lumber, grain, wool and hides. It was known as Hall’s Mills, 1836-1857, for Cyrenius Hall (1788-1860). Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
IsaacCrouse1.JPG Isaac Crouse Plaque This plaque reads: Isaac Crouse (1825-1915), London pioneer, farmer, bridge builder, millwright, contractor for the Blackfriar’s Bridge (1875), London’s first iron bridge. He also built the first and second Meadowlily bridges and erected the superstructures and abutements for the Dundas, King, Oxford and Wellington Street bridges.   Click here to show map location
JosiahBlackburn1.JPG Josiah Blackburn Plaque This plaque reads: The son of a Congregationalist minister, Blackburn was born in London, England. After some experience in journalism he immigrated to Canada West (now Ontario) in 1850 and joined the staff of The Star in Paris. Two years later he purchased a small London weekly, The Canadian Free Press, from its founder, William Sutherland. Blackburn's keen business sense and flair for political writing made this newspaper a success. In 1855 he began a daily, The London Free Press and Daily Western Advertiser - later, The London Free Press. He also controlled The Ingersoll Chronicle and helped found The Mail in Toronto. An ardent liberal who later became an equally fervent conservative, he was one of the province's most influential newspaper publishers. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
Labour Memorial Park Plaque.jpg Labour Memorial Park Historic Plaque The plaque reads: Dedicated to the pioneer trades unionists of Tolpuddle, Dorset, England, who settled in this district after their exile, 1834-1837. “We have injured no man’s reputation, character, person or property. We were uniting to preserve ourselves, our wives and children from utter degradation and starvation.” George Loveless 1834 [1967-1969] Accompanying plaque: Re-dedicated September 1999 with the support of the City of London, the London Public Library Board, the London Building Trades Council & the London & District Labour Council.   Click here to show map location
LawsonSite1.JPG Lawson Place Plaque Site This Plaque reads: About 1500 A.D. a Prehistoric Neutral (Late Ontario Iroquois) Indian village occupied this site. Archaeological excavations suggest that it was an agricultural community covering 1.5-2 ha and housing approximately 1,000 inhabitants in communal longhouses. Strategically located so that protection was provided by steep slopes leading down to Medway River and Snake Creek, the village was heavily fortified in exposed areas by palisades, earthworks, ditches and lookout platforms stockpiled with rocks. Although the existence of the site was known in the nineteenth century, the first extensive excavations were undertaken in 1921-23 at which time it was named after the Lawson family who then owned the property. In 1969 this land was donated to the University of Western Ontario to ensure preservation of this important heritage resource. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
Locust Mount Historic Plaque.jpg Locust Mount Historic Plaque The plaque reads: Residence of Elijah Leonard Jr. (1814-91) pioneer iron founder and leading London entrepreneur; Mayor of London, 1857, Legislative Councillor Malahide Division, 1862-67; Senator of Canada, 1867-91. Fully Accessible; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
LombardoHome1.JPG Lombardo Home Plaque This plaque reads: this plaque marks the site of the LOMBARDO HOME where Guy, Lebert and Victoria in the early 1920’s practised their music and formed the dance band which became famous as the ROYAL CANADIANS. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
FireStation1.JPG London Fire Station No.4 This plaque reads: This typical fire station, erected 1909, was proposed by chief John A. Roe, member of London’s first paid fire department from 1873 until his death in action 1904. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
PiccadillyPark1.JPG Piccadilly Park This plaque reads: This Ordinance Survey stone marks the north-east corner of the former Military Lands where units of the British Garrisons were stationed between 1838 and 1868. In 1873 the Ordinance Lands became the property of the municipality and Victoria Park was created in the area to the south of Cetnral Avenue. The Fair Grounds occupied the northern section until moving to the Queen’s Park site in 1887. Carling’s Creek, which flowed to the west below this point, was dammed to form Lake Horn. Provincial Plaque  
SpringbankPumphouse1.JPG Pumphouse at Springbank Park This Plaque reads: Designed by City Engineer and Architect William Robinson in 1878m the Springbank Pumphouse signified a major advance in the field of local public health through the controlled provision of a pure and assured supply of water. In 1876 City Council voted to accept a plan to construct a waterworks system west of London on the south bank of the Thames River. The recommended source of the water was Coombs Springs, which was channelled to various holding ponds through a series of underground drainage tiles. The water was then directed to the pumphouse which was situated next to the dam, parts of which can still be seen today. The river provided the hydraulic pressure to pump the water to the top of reservoir hill. From that point, gravity was used to pipe the water to various points of the City. In 1881, a second building was designed by Thomas Tracey on the pumphouse site to house the steam pumping equipment which was used as a back up to the hydraulic power. The most striking feature of the original pumphouse (1878) at Springbank Park is its centre gable and steeply pitched hip roof, typical of the Ontario Cottage Style. Other features of note include pilasters with ornamental brackets: windows with stone sills, stone segmental arches and incised key stones; and a triangular window above the date stone located within the centre gable. The extra bay on the south side of the building was added early in this century. The pumphouse originally had a metal (fireproof) roof, an iron floor, and roof girders. The second building constructed on this site (Thomas Tracey, 1881) was located to the south west of the original pumphouse. Designed aslo in the form of an Ontario Cottage, it contains features such as metal brackets, bargeboards, and a date stone shaped in the form of a triangular window on the original pumphouse structure. This building also features polychromatic brickwork and paired windows. Photographs indicate that there were originally paired windows on each side of the frontispiece. Finally, a third building designed by John. M. Moore was built in 1894 to link the original pumphouse and second building, thus making it one building rather than two. The Pumphouse ceased operation in 1967 when the Lake Huron pipeline came to London. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
Somerville1.JPG Somerville House This plaque reads: C. Ross “Sandy” Somerville (1903-1991); of London was one of Canada’s outstanding athletes excelling in badminton, football, hockey, cricket, and, most notably, golf. He was Canadian Amateur Champion (1926,1928,1931,1935, 1937), Ontario Amateur Champion (1927-1929, 1937), Manitoba Amateur Champion (1926) and United States Amateur Champion (1932). In 1950, he was recognized by the Royal Canadian Golf Association as Canadian Golfer of the Half Century (1900-1950). Street View only   Click here to show map location
StJohnEvangelist1.JPG St. John's Church This plaque reads: erected on Hellmuth College grounds, after a design by London architect Charles F. Cox, opened on November 11th 1888. The church school building was added in 1895 and the spire in 1897. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
StPatrick1.JPG St. Patrick's Parish This plaque reads: Catholics began to settle in Biddulph and Neighboring Townships in the 1840’s around the time of the Great Famine in Ireland. For some years missionary priests from St. Thomas and London administered the sacraments in various pioneer homes and halls. In 1848 James Kelly donated five acres of his farm for use by the church. In 1850 a log church was built and the cemetery was consecrated. Father Peter Francis Crinnon became the first resident pastor in 1854. The church with its tall slender tower and lofty spire was erected during 1858-59 in the early Ontario gothic style. In 1869 the rectory was built in the Italianate style. The original one-room parish school, now used as a parish hall, was built in 1883. St. Patrick’s remains one of the few parish centres in Ontario which still retains all its original buildings: church, school, and rectory. In 1962 the present parish school was opened. During 1984-85 this historic church was completely renovated on its western side, a new chapel was erected. This plaque was blessed and dedicated by Most Rev. John Michael Sherlock, D.D., Bishop of London and President of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops, on Sunday, June 16th 1985. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
s Rectory Historic Plaque.jpg St. Peter's Rectory Historic Plaque The plaque reads: Built originally as the Roman Catholic Bishop’s Palace about 1873-74, it has served as seminary, rectory and general church office for the Diocese of London. Fully Accessible; Provincial Plaque; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
SuperTest1.JPG Supertest Site Plaque This plaque reads: J. Gordon Thompson and James D. Good founded London Automative Service Ltd. In May 1923. The company name was changed to Supertest Petroleum Corporation Limited in 1925. Supertest pioneered new standards for service for motorists with uniformed attendants offering to wash the windshield and check the oil and tires. They sold a gasoline named Supertest and used the slogan “All Canadian”, eventually opening retail outlets throughout Ontario and Quebec. The Head office for Supertest was in London until 1971 merger with British Petroleum (Canada), which was purchased by Petro-Canada in 1983. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
Talbot Street School Historic Plaque.jpg Talbot Street School Historic Plaque The plaque reads: Built in 1882 on the site of an 1858 frame school, gutted by fire, and restored in 1892. London’s first kindergarten and Mothers’ Club, later Home and School Association originate here. Fully Accessible; Provincial Plaque; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
WolseleyBarracks1.JPG The Royal Canadian Regiment Museum Plaque This plaque reads: This building, typical of military architecture of its period, was built in 1886 to provide quarters for the recently authorized "D" Company, Infantry School Corps, an early step in the development of the Permanent Forces of Canada. In 1901, after three changes, the Corps was renamed the Royal Canadian Regiment. Regimental Headquarters moved here in 1923. During the years 1914-18 and 1939-45 while the regiment was on active service the building was used for recruiting, training and demobilization. The Regiment returned to the Barracks in 1953. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
VictoriaDisaster1.JPG The Victoria Disaster Plaque This plaque reads: On May 24, 1881, one of Canada's worst marine disasters occurred on the Thames River near this site. The "Victoria", a small, double-decked stern-wheeler commanded by Captain Donald Rankin, was conducting holiday excursion trips between London and Springbank Park. On a return trip to London the boat was dangerously overcrowded with more than 600 passengers. Oblivious of the danger, the crowd repeatedly shifted from side to side, resulting in flooding and a precarious rocking motion of the boat. It finally heeled over and the boiler crashed through the bulwarks, bringing the upper-deck and large awning down upon the struggling crowd. The "Victoria" sank immediately and at least 182 people, the majority from London, lost their lives.   Click here to show map location
Toll Gates on the Proof Line Road - House2.jpg Toll Gates on the Proof Line Road Historic Plaque The plaque reads: This pioneer road through London Township was maintained by the Proof Line Road Joint Stock Company from 1849 to 1907. The road, with its toll gates and overnight accommodation along the route, linked farmers and markets. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
Union School Historic Plaque.jpg Union School Historic Plaque The plaque reads: Built on this site, 1849, was the first London Central School supported by property taxes rather than fees for elementary and higher learning well-known principals were Nicholas Wilson and J. B. Boyle. Fully Accessible; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
Waverley - Site2.jpg Waverley Historic Plaque The plaque reads: Built in 1882 for Charles Goodhue, Waverley is one of the mansions that made Grand Avenue a showpiece of London during the late nineteenth century. Charles inherited the wealth that enabled him to build the house for his father, the lawyer and entrepreneur George Goohhue, who was reputed to be London's first millionaire. The final designs for Waverley were drawn by George Durand: they extensively modified earlier drawings produced by Goodhue's brother-in-law, English architect Hamilton Tovey. In 1893, Charles Goodhue's daughter sold Waverley to Thomas Smallman. A founder of the Imperial Oil Company, and later, of the London Life Insurance Company. After Smallman's death, Waverley was inhabited by their daughter Eleanor and her husband Claude Kyd Morgan. The building later gained fame as the home of the Shute Institute, which pioneered the medical applications of Vitamin E. The two-and-a-half storey white brick house is an impressive example of the highly decorated early Queen Anne style. The house contains an abundance of exterior ornamental woodwork and brickwork, in its shingled gables and dormers, its belvedere and its several porches, in its bracketed eaves, in its decorative panels and in the chimneys. The Smallmans added the porte cochere with its elaborately turned posts. The Morgan's added the conservatory and the round porch. Waverley and its near-neighbour Idlewyld together still project the image of the grandeur that once characterized and defined Grand Avenue. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
Western Hotel Historic Plaque.jpg Western Hotel Historic Plaque The plaque reads: Established about 1843 by Peter McCann London terminus of the Lucan stagecoach lines later the Westervelt Business School. Fully Accessible; Provincial Plaque; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
White Ox Inn Historic Plaque.jpg White Ox Inn Historic Plaque The plaque reads: Built on this site, 1849, was the first London Central School supported by property taxes rather than fees for elementary and higher learning well-known principals were Nicholas Wilson and J. B. Boyle. Fully Accessible; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
Wilberforce1.JPG Wilberforce Settlement Plaque This plaque reads: In 1829 a group of fugitive Negro slaves in Cincinnati decided to seek a more secure refuge in Canada. In 1830, with the help of the Quakers in Oberlin, Ohio, they purchased 800 acres of land in this vicinity from the Canada Company. A settlement was established, the first in Biddulph Township, and groups from New England and New York State joined those from Ohio. By 1833 there were thirty-two families, two schools and a sawmill in this settlement, which was named after the great British abolitionist William Wilberforce. One of the earliest Negro colonies in Upper Canada, its population dwindled rapidly in the 1840’s although some families remained for more than a generation. Kid-Friendly; Provincial Plaque; Site has its own Parking; Site Offers Food; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
PaulPeelMuseumLondon1.JPG Paul Peel Plaque at Museum London This Plaque reads: Paul Peel 1860-1892 This noted Canadian Atrist was born in this city and about 1875 had a studio on Richmond Street in the marble works operated by his father. After studying in Philadelphia and the Royal Academy Schools, London, England, he moved to Paris in 1887 where he worked under such prominent painters as Gerome, Boulanger, and Constant. Peel is represented in the National Gallery of Canada by “Mother Love.” A Venetian Bather and other canvases. Examples of his work are also to be found in the civic galleries of London, Toronto, Vancouver and in other public and private collections. After a short but brilliant career, Peel died in Paris in 1892. Fully Accessible; Provincial Plaque; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
FirstHussars2.JPG First Hussars Museum This plaque reads: The museum commemorates the magnificent fighting reputation which members of the FIRST HUSSARS won in South Africa, and in Northwester Europe during two World Wars, and also pays tribute to those Canadian comrades who gave their lives in the cause of freedom. From its modest beginnings in 1856 as 1st London Volunteer Troop of Cavalry, consolidation into a regiment in 1872, and designation as the FIRST HUSSARS in 1892, this combat unit earned thirty-four Battle Honours. “HODIE NON CRAS” (Today Not Tomorrow) Provincial Plaque; Site has its own Parking http://www.firsthussars.ca/#!regimental-history/c1qcx Click here to show map location
HarrietBoomer1.JPG Harriet Boomer Plaque This plaque reads: Site of her home from 1905-1916. First female trustee of the London Board of Education, 1898. President of the London Area Council of Women, 1897-1920. Strong proponent of education for young women, particularly in the areas of business and domestic science. Street View only http://www.londonpubliclibrary.ca/node/3408 Click here to show map location
BuchanHouse1.JPG Buchan House Plaque This plaque reads: Buchan House From 1888-1920 Residence of T.B. Escott, Prominent wholesale grocer. Later the home of the London Institute of Musical Art founded by A.D. Jordan; Western Ontario;Conservatory of Music; and Tweedsmuir BR. Of the Royal Canadian Legion. Provincial Plaque http://historicplaces.ca/en/rep-reg/place-lieu.aspx?id=8569
LabattPark1.JPG Labatt Memorial Park Plaque This plaque reads: Labatt Memorial Park, Interpretative Plaque Labatt Park is London’s oldest sporting facility as is believed to be the world’s oldest baseball field, in continuous use, in its original location. Nestled at the Forks of Thames River, this landmark athletic field has been the centre for London and area’s sports and recreational activities since 1877. Over the years the park has also been used for track and field, softball, fastball, public skating, soccer, political rallies, boxing, football, the RCMP Musical Ride and horse jumping. In 2001, the park is the major baseball venue for the 2001 Canada Summer Games.   Click here to show map location
LillysCorners1.JPG Lilly's Corner Plaque This plaque reads: Charles Lilley (1833-1927) opened his grocery in 1872 and later his post office Lilley’s corners, in this block. In 1884-5 He served as mayor of the town of London east. Early centre of the oil refining industry. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
AdamShortt1.JPG Adam Shortt Plaque This plaque reads: Adam Shortt 1859-1931 Born near London, Shortt studied at Queen’s University and in Scotland, later returning to Queen’s where he established the department of political economy. A noted teacher, he as an advisor to governments, served on several commissions, and in 1908, after 22 years of teaching became a member of the first Canadian Civil Service Commission. In Ottawa, in association with the Dominion Archivist, Arthur Dougty, he helped develop the collections of the national archives. Between 1913 and 1917 the two co-edited the important historical series Canada and its Provinces. Street View only   Click here to show map location
MiddlesexCourtHouse2.JPG Middlesex County Administration Building This Plaque Reads: Middlesex Court House Erected in 1830, this building was modelled after Malahide Castle, near Dublin, Ireland, the ancestral home of Colonel Thomas Talbot, founder of the Talbot Settlement. The site was a part of the town plot set aside by Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe after his visit to The Forks in February, 1793. Here he proposed to locate the provincial capital. Provincial Plaque; Street View only   Click here to show map location
EldonHouse1.JPG Eldon House This plaque reads: Built in 1834 by Capt. John Harris, R.N., treasurer of the London District, this is London’s oldest remaining house. With his wife Amelia, daughter of Samuel Ryerse, Harris came to London after the District offices were moved here from Victoria. For many years Eldon House was a centre of London’s cultural and social life, and four generations of the Harris family dwelt in it during more than 125 years. In 1960 the family gave the house with most of its furnishings and eleven acres of land, to the City of London for a museum and park. Provincial Plaque; Washrooms http://www.eldonhouse.ca Click here to show map location
SalvationArmy1.JPG Salvation Army Citadel Plaque The plaque reads: Near this spot the first meeting in Canada of the Salvation Army was conducted in May 1882. “WHAT HATH GOD WROUGHT”   Click here to show map location
DominionPublicBuilding2.JPG Dominion Public Building This plaque reads: Heritage Property, Dominion Public Building 1935 The Dominion Public Building was built in 1935-36 by what is now known as Public Works and Government Services Canada in the Classical Moderne style using stylized Art Deco decorative carvings in the masonry. The local architects responsible for the design were of the firm Watt and Blackwell in association with Roy O. Moore. The building has been designated a classified heritage property by the Federal Government for its historical associations, its impressive architectural design, and its importance within its urban setting. The narrow Richmond Street façade presents a strong vertical thrust through the stepped – backside wall, the extra two storeys of the central tower and the deeply incised vertical window recesses. The building material is smooth ashtar limestone with polished black granite is a plintin course and around the doors. The decorative carvings in masonry have a strong Canadian content which was due to the influence of John Lyle an architect from Toronto. As well as these are elements in bronze and other materials popular in that time. The side facades continue the strong massing, vertical emphasis and stylized decorative featuring of the Richmond Street version in a more restrained fashion. The main lobby of the Dominion Public Building is an outstanding example of the Classical Moderne principles applied to interior design, with careful massing and proportion, simple stylized decorative detailing and elegant materials. The polished marble walls and coordinated terrazzo floors complement the detailed coffered ceilings, and brass and bronze door fittings. Because of its size, its function and its design it has a prominent urban presence which is enhanced by the open green space of St. Paul’s Cathedral across the street. Made possible by City of London – Federal Historical Building Review Office National Historic Site; Ontario Heritage Trust; Provincial Plaque; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
GrandTheatre2.JPG Grand Theatre Plaques This plaque reads: City of London Designated Heritage Building Grand Theatre (1901; Rebuilt 1978) Theatre has had a long tradition in London started in 1839 with the opening of a British Army Garrison Theatre. Local productions and travelling shows appeared in a variety of locations until 1880 when the Grand Opera House at King and Richmond was opened. It was leased by C.J. Whitney, a Detroit theatre promoter who booked the biggest acts of the day including Henry Irving, Annie Pixley, and Sarah Bernhardt. The Grand burned in 1900 and was replaced by Whitney and his partner Torontonian Ambrose Small with this building completed in 1901. With 1850 seats, it was one of the largest theatres in Ontario. The proscenium arch, the side boxes and the two balconies were typical of touring houses of the day. Small’s disappearance a few hours after selling his theatre chain in 1919 remains a mystery to this day. Famous Players bought the building in 1924 and converted it to a movie theatre though it always remained more popular as an amateur theatre. In 1945, the local amateur theatre company, the London Little Theatre, bought the Grand where they had been performing since 1934. Many Londoners acted in, directed and worked behind the scenes of the nearly 250 LLT productions. Many received national awards at the Dominion Drama Festival competitions, particularly during Peter Dearing’s years as artistic director. (1957-1968) The LLT turned professional in 1971 under the name Theatre London, later renamed the Grand Theatre. A massive renovation which saw most of the building demolished except for the arch and the stage, was completed in 1978. Kid-Friendly; Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
StPaulsCathedral1.JPG St. Paul's Cathedral Plaque This plaque reads: St. Paul’s Cathedral 1846 The nave and tower of the this church were designed in English Gothic Revival style by architect William Thomas and constructed 1844-46. Previously the Anglican congregation had held services in a wooden structure on the site. It had been opened in 1834 but was destroyed by fire ten years later. The first residential missionary to serve the London area was Reverend E.J. Boswell who arrived in 1829. He was succeeded by the Reverend Benjamin Cronyn in 1833. In 1857 the Diocese of Huron was created and St. Paul’s designate as its cathedral. Here for the first time in the British Empire a synod elected a bishop. Extensively altered in 1892-94, the building remains one of London’s outstanding landmarks. Guided Tours; Provincial Plaque http://www.stpaulscathedral.on.ca/ Click here to show map location
ToddleInn3.JPG Todd Inn Restaurant This plaque reads: Operated as a blacksmith shop by W. John Lashbrook, 1893-1918, and continued later by Richard Weir as a smithy until 1947 when it was sold and converted to a restaurant by C.W. Egleston. Provincial Plaque; Site has its own Parking; Site Offers Food; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
Kingsmills1.JPG Kingsmill This plaque reads: Kingsmill is one of the oldest traditional department stores in London Ontario. Founded in 1865, the Kingsmill department store is one of the most beloved stores in London. Kid-Friendly; Ontario Heritage Trust   Click here to show map location
StPetersBasilica1.JPG St. Peter's Catholic Basilica Plaque This plaque reads: Begun in 1880 and dedicated on June 28, 1885, this magnificent structure was built during the episcopate of Bishop John Walsh to serve as the cathedral for the Diocese of London. Designed by the prominent architect, Joseph Connolly, it was constructed in the 13th-century French Gothic style which was favoured by Ontario's Roman Catholics in the late 19th century. Among the cathedral's most notable features are its massive bell towers, high transepts, imposing sanctuary and fine rose window made in Innsbruck, Austria. Although the interior was decorated in 1925-26 and the towers, sacristy and chapel completed in 1957-58, the building retains its original character. A religious centre for southwestern Ontario, St. Peter's Cathedral was designated a minor Basilica by the Vatican in 1961. Provincial Plaque; Washrooms   Click here to show map location
LondonYMCA1.JPG One London Place This plaque reads: The London YMCA, one of Ontario’s oldest, was established in 1856 by William Bowman, and moved from 394-6 Clarence Street to its first purpose – built facility on this site in 1897. The building was enlarged in the 1950’s. In January 1981 a devastating fire left the building unusable. The site was later sold to Sifton Properties which constructed One London Place in 1992.   Click here to show map location
MechanicsInstitue1.JPG Mechanic's Institute This plaque reads: The Mechanic’s Institute was founded in 1835 as a library, reading room and laboratory. In 1876 it relocated to a new building at 231 Dundas Street and remained there until 1895 when its collection acquired by London’s first public library. Provincial Plaque; Street View only   Click here to show map location
Library1.JPG Central London Public Library This Plaque reads: on this site stood the first London Public Library founded in 1895. Present addition YMCA-YWCA building was erected in 1955. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
HaroldRogers1.JPG Harold Rosers Plaque - Armories Hotel This plaque reads: The founder of Kinsmen & Kinette Clubs of Canada was born and raised at 324 Dundas Street, directly across from the armouries. Seeking the camaraderie he had experienced in the army during the First World War, "Hal" Rogers began the first Kinsmen Club in Hamilton in 1920. Under his guidance other clubs soon formed, each dedicated to "serving the community's greatest need". Ongoing contributions from women prompted the formation of the Kinettes in 1942. During the Second World War, Rogers chaired the "Milk for Britain" campaign, the first of the clubs' many national projects. By visiting clubs across Canada throughout his life, he inspired countless young Canadians to serve their communities. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
JohnKinderLabatt1.JPG Labatt Brewerie This plaque reads: Born in Ireland, John Kinder Labatt came to Canada in 1834 and began farming near London. In 1847 he acquired an interest in the London brewery of Samuel Eccles, which had been established by John Balkwill in 1827-28. On Eccles' retirement in 1854, Labatt became the sole owner of the brewery which, under his son and grandson, became one of Canada's largest. John Labatt was also active in the establishment of London's early financial institutions and a promoter of local road and rail transportation.   Click here to show map location
PaulPeel1.JPG Paul Peel's House This plaque reads: Born in London, Ontario, Peel became one of the most prominent Canadian painters of the French academic school of painting and among the first to gain an international reputation. He studied art in Philadelphia, London, England, and Paris where he was influenced by the current European fashion for polished brush technique and subjects taken from everyday life. In 1890 his most famous painting, "After The Bath", was awarded a medal at the Paris Salon. He returned to Canada twice to exhibit his work and was elected a fellow of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts in 1890. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
BostwickCemetery1.JPG Bostwick Cementery This plaque reads: Born in Ireland, John Kinder Labatt came to Canada in 1834 and began farming near London. In 1847 he acquired an interest in the London brewery of Samuel Eccles, which had been established by John Balkwill in 1827-28. On Eccles' retirement in 1854, Labatt became the sole owner of the brewery which, under his son and grandson, became one of Canada's largest. John Labatt was also active in the establishment of London's early financial institutions and a promoter of local road and rail transportation. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
Idlewyld2.JPG Idlewyld Historic Plaque This Plaque reads: Built in 1878 for the Hon. Charles Smith Hyman, Privy Councillor (1854-1926), Industrialist; Mayor of London, 1884; Liberal M.P. London, 1891-1892, 1900-1907; Minister of Public Works under Sir Wilfrid Laurier; noted amateur sportsman. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
Beechwood1.JPG Beechwood Plaque at Gartshore Estate Aparments This Plaque reads: erected in 1854 by John Birrel (1815-1875), merchant and later 3rd president of the Huron and Erie purchased 1891 by Col. William M. Gartshore (1853-1931), president of McClary’s and one-time Mayor of London. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
UWOSod1.JPG UWO - Science Centre Plaque This Plaque reads: Near this site, on April 15, 1922, the first sod was turned for the Arts Building (University College) by Governor-General Lord Byng of Vimy. Two years later, The University of Western Ontario moved from St. George Street to this location, its third campus. Provincial Plaque   Click here to show map location
HuronCollege1.JPG Huron College Plaque This plaque reads: The college was founded by the Right Reverend Benjamin Cronyn who, following his election in 1857 as first Anglican Bishop of Huron, saw the need for a theological school and institution for advanced studies to serve the rapidly expanding population of the region. He selected Archdeacon Isaac Hellmuth to raise funds in England and Canada, and Huron College was incorporated in May 1863. Under Hellmuth's capable direction, 1863-66, the institution provided theological training and a course in liberal arts. In 1877 the professors and alumni of this college, strongly supported by Hellmuth, proposed the establishment of the Western University of London, founded in 1878, with which Huron became affiliated in 1881. Fully Accessible; Provincial Plaque; Site has its own Parking; Washrooms   Click here to show map location

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Group London Heritage Council
Added By Heritage Council
Date Added October 30, 2013
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