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Tour Title Wellington Street - Kingston
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  103 Wellington St 103 Wellington St. is an 1837 Greek revival cottage. It has an elaborate doorway with the pattern repeated over the windows. Street View only   Click here to show map location
  96 Wellington St 96 Wellington St. is an unusual three-storey double house or duplex at the corner of Wellington and William Streets. Built in 1841, it was a rental property when Kingston was the capital of Canada. The walls facing the street are stone but parts of the rear walls are brick. It is possible there would have been additions to this building if the capital had not moved to Montréal in 1843. Street View only   Click here to show map location
  67 Earl St 67 Earl St. on the left corner was built in 1847. The right hand side of the house was probably duplicated on the left before alterations. The windows and balcony in the roof are all additions – the balcony in about 1900 and the two windows in about 1960. Street View only   Click here to show map location
  66-68 Earl St 66-68 Earl St. on the right corner was built in 1842, a two-storey, limestone double house. Notice the doorways with Venetian windows and balconies above them. Other houses on Earl St. are included in the Earl St. Walking Tour. Street View only   Click here to show map location
  Wellington Street School 47 Wellington St. was built as the Wellington Street School. It was designed by John Power in 1873, cost $7,200 and was the most modern school in the city at the time. Since it closed in 1927, it has been a badminton club, HMCS Cataraqui, an engineering laboratory and apartments – which shows just how buildings can be repurposed Street View only   Click here to show map location
  89-91 Gore St 89-91 Gore St. is on your left at the corner of Gore St. and Wellington St. It is a three-storey stone house with two doors on Gore and one on Wellington St. There are semi-circular arched entrances with recessed doors and a large blind arch above each. This house was built in 1842 as a rental property when Kingston was expected to boom as the capital city of the United Provinces. Street View only   Click here to show map location
  92 Gore St 92 Gore St. across the street, on your right at the corner of Gore St. and Wellington St., was built in 1839 as a without the wing on Wellington St. One of the doorways on Gore has been blocked off. When it was built, a carpenter lived there with his woodworking yard behind the house. Note that the second floor windows have pieces of ironwork in the lower corners. These pieces originally held back shutters. Street View only   Click here to show map location
  32-38 Wellington St 32-38 Wellington St. is a brick terrace built in two sections between 1873 and 1879. These four houses, examples of middle-class housing, have a high stone foundation. There are two carriageways with arched entrances. Each house has a recessed doorway, and there are six dormers. The porches are later additions. Street View only   Click here to show map location
  81 Lower Union St. A few houses down on the left is 81 Lower Union St., a one-and-ahalf- storey brick cottage built in 1875. Notice the door, especially the very narrow side windows, and the porch with its Doric pillars. The roof windows are Gothic in style and there is a carved wooden (bargeboard) decoration in the central gable. Street View only   Click here to show map location
  Charles Place 75 Lower Union St. (Charles Place) is a regency cottage that was built sometime before 1832. The Oliver family owned it from 1832 to 1898. The servants’ quarters upstairs were converted to family bedrooms in the 1840s. That is when the dormer and the small upper porch were added. It is called “Charles Place” for one-time owner Charles Oliver, to avoid confusion between it and a house belonging to George Oliver. It has a deeply recessed central porch. The doorway and sidelight windows are intricately designed with fancy borders. The other windows at the front of the house include both 8 over 8 panes of glass and 12 over 12 panes. Street View only   Click here to show map location
  65 West Street 65 West Street has a corner tower, very popular in 1879. It was built for $1,275. This house completed a streetscape of red brick buildings all built in the 1870’s. Street View only   Click here to show map location
  57-63 West St Next door is Westbourne Terrace at 57-63 West St. It was built in 1874. 63 was lived in by the original owner while three of his children lived in other parts of the terrace. It has a two-storey bay window with a projecting gable roof. The other three have single-storey bay windows. There is a central carriage-way. Street View only   Click here to show map location
  55 West St. At the far end of Westbourne Terrace is 55 West St., built in 1877 and altered in 1892. It is similar in appearance to Westbourne Terrace, although it was built separately and later. The first owner was a lawyer, Cornelius Price, who later became a judge. Street View only   Click here to show map location

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Group Heritage Resources Centre
Added By HRC Admin
Date Added April 21, 2012
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