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Common Name Hough House
Municipal Address 100 Laird Avenue South, Amherstburg, Ontario
Photos:

Building Demolished No
Postal Code N9V 2Z2
Local Municipality Amherstburg
Province Ontario
Construction Date 1861
Type of Recognition National Historic Site
Building Historic Use Residence Estate
Building Current Use Leisure Historic or Interpretive Site
Building Form
Massing Units Single Detached Single Detached
Plan Irregular Irregular
Wings None None
Storeys 2 1/2 2 1/2
Main Exterior Wall
Basement / Foundation Wall Material Stone Stone
Wood Finish Ashlar Imitation Ashlar Imitation, Board & Batten Board & Batten
Brick Stretcher Bond Stretcher Bond
Wall Design and Detail Portico Portico, Entablature Entablature
Roof shape and Detail
Roof Type Gable Gable
Roof Surface Material Wood Wood
Roof Trim - Eaves Moulded Moulded
Roof Trim - Verges Returned Eave Returned Eave
Dormers Segmental or Curved Segmental or Curved
Chimneys Single Single
Typical Window
Structural Opening Flat Flat
Structural & Decorative Form Flat Arch Flat Arch, Lug-Sill Lug-Sill
Sash Arrangement Double-Hung Double-Hung, Multiple Multiple
Special Pane Arrangment - Double-Hung 6/6 6/6
Special Pane Arrangment - Casement 3/3 3/3
Main Entrance
Location Centre (facade) Centre (facade)
Structural Opening Segmental Segmental
Structural & Decorative Form Shaped Transom Shaped Transom
Entrance Special Features Side-Lights Side-Lights
Access
Entrance Stair Ground Floor Ground Floor, Side Side
Property Features
Acessory Structures     Other
Acessory Structures other Single Storey Sunroom
Landscape Fence or Gate Fence or Gate, Water Water, Trees Trees
Design
Architect Kivas Tully (original building); Harold McEvers (residence building)
Notes on the Design or Physical Value 's purpose was to replace an existing laundry building in the same location that had burned down in 1860. This replacement house would serve as a laundry, bakery, and storehouse for the Provincial Malden Lunatic Asylum that was in the process of repurposing the previous military fort buildings to accommodate patient needs.
The land surrounding the building was purchased in 1875 by the Park & Borrowman Lumber Company for the purpose of converting the area into a planing mill. The company renovated the building to serve as the actual mill itself. As a result, the building adopted a more utilitarian design by adding smoke stacks and using simple wooden doors and window frames. Images taken of the building at this point in its history seem almost unrecognizable from the Colonial Revival design it maintains today.
In 1918 the land was purchased by Franklin A. Hough to transform it and its buildings to resemble a more manor like atmosphere. Under the architect, Harold McEvers, Hough had the mill converted into his private residence and all other surrounding buildings torn down or relocated. It is at this point that the building receives its familiar name and more familiar architectural design.
The land was purchased in 1946 by the Town of Amherstburg who in turn handed it over to Parks Canada. The federal government had previously determined Fort Malden to be a National Historic Site in 1940; with the addition of the Hough House property in 1946 the designation was complete. The house itself was converted into the Visitor Interpretation Centre for the park. Currently, the house is under construction to become Fort Malden'
Sources Amherstburg 1796-1996: The New Town in the Garrison Grounds Volume I, Edited by Don Tupling. Amherstburg: Amherstburg Bicentennial Book Committee, 1997.

“Hough House 91-181: Heritage Character Statement.” Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office. Accessed October 18, 2014, http://www.historicplaces.ca/media/15425/1991-181(e)houghhouse.pdf.

Carter-Edwards, Dennis. “Fort Malden: A Structural Narrative History 1796-1976.” Parks Canada Manuscript Volume II, no. 401 (1980).
Photos:
(Click on the image to view at full size)
Hough House Present Day
Hough House Present Day. © Kayla Dettinger
This image depicts the south side of the Hough House in 2014. The house itself is under renovation to once again be used as a museum for Fort Malden. There have been some additions to the house to accommodate visitors, such as an access ramp and emergency escape stairs. As well, a small cabin has been constructed behind the sunroom for the use of the historical interpreters who work at the Fort. In the background of this image the 1819 brick barrack can be seen. This is important in recognizing that the Hough House stands as a central attraction point at Fort Malden.

Hough House Present Day (2)
Hough House Present Day (2). © Kayla Dettinger
This image depicts the north face of the Hough House. The building is currently under construction to be renovated into the Fort[nowiki]'s museum. One can see how Hough's attempts to turn the site into a manor-[/nowiki]like estate were successful with the large expanse of lawns and the bordering Detroit River in the background.

Hough House Present Day (3)
Hough House Present Day (3). © Kayla Dettinger
This image depicts the east face of the Hough House. It is interesting to note that the building was constructed atop the military earthworks. This unique image is useful in depicting how the Fort, and the Hough House in particular, has served many different purposes since the Fort[nowiki]'s original creation in 1796 and the House'[/nowiki]s in 1861.

Hough House Present Day (4)
Hough House Present Day (4). © Kayla Dettinger
This image depicts some of the more architectural details present in the north face of the Hough House. The House was remodeled in the Colonial Revival Style under Harold McEvers[nowiki]'[/nowiki]s design, altering the original structure built by Kivas Tully in 1861. Several of the more subtle aspects of the design have been removed, such as the window and fireplace trims. Additionally, there have been several alterations to the ceilings and doors that are not considered period to the Revival Style. However, one of the main focal points of the house, the projecting front portico with its Palladian window, has been maintained.

Hough House Present Day (5)
Hough House Present Day (5). © Kayla Dettinger
This image depicts the west side of the Hough House, highlighting the sunroom. As well, this image is unique in showcasing the different purposes that Fort Malden served in its two hundred year history by showing how close the house is in comparison to the military earthworks.

Context
Notes on Context The Hough House is located centrally within Fort Malden National Historical Site in Amherstburg, ON. Bordering the Detroit River, it is built on top of remaining military earth works and located opposite of the 1819 brick barrack. Almost every building within Fort Malden represents a different point within the Fort[nowiki]'[/nowiki]s history as each building was constructed at different times and to serve different purposes. Particularly, the manor like atmosphere of the Hough House with its expansive lawns represents its time as a private residence and should be maintained as a significant design characteristic according to Parks Canada.
Sources “Hough House 91-181: Heritage Character Statement.” Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office. Accessed October 18, 2014, http://www.historicplaces.ca/media/15425/1991-181(e)houghhouse.pdf.

“Hough House: Recognized Federal Heritage Building.” Parks Canada. Accessed October 18, 2014, http://www.pc.gc.ca/apps/dfhd/page_fhbro_eng.aspx?id=5557.

“Archived Structural Stabilization of Hough House at FT Malden NHS.” Public Works and Government Services Canada. Accessed October 18, 2014, https://buyandsell.gc.ca/procurement-data/tender-notice/PW-14-00637470.
Historical
Historic Owner Malden Provincial Lunatic Asylum - Under Direction of Dr. Andrew Fisher
Park & Borrowman Lumber Company
Franklin A. Hough
Town of Amherstburg
Parks Canada
Notes on History of the Property 's curative methods was to employ both able male and female patients as labours on the asylum, performing landscaping duties or household chores. Something quite interesting resulting from this practice is the belief that currently a ghost named Mary, who was formally a laundress at the asylum, is said to haunt the house where she met a tragic death due to a fire. There is evidence that a Mary McGowan was employed as a laundry maid during the Fort's asylum years. Additionally, the name Mary McGowan identified as a laundry maid is found on an admitted patients record for the asylum. While a death record for this woman has not been located nor any significant damaging fires to the Hough House found documented, it could be possible that these women are one in the same. It is quite intriguing to consider Dr. Fisherss methods are considered radical for his focus on therapeutic healing. For example, he allowed for patient dances, an accessible library, and emphasized reducing the amount of medications prescribed. His rather lenient methods reacted well with the town's residents who considered the asylum to be an economic asset to Amherstburg.
However, after 1870 the fort remained abandoned until 1875 when the Park & Borrowman Lumber Company purchased the land, known as Lot 4, surrounding the Hough House at public auction. Not much is documented about the history of the house during this time. This is probably due to the fact that Park & Borrowman converted the house itself into the planing mill and the house adopted a solely industrial purpose. The company remained inactive during World War I, and in 1918 a daughter of the owners sold the company and the land to Franklin A. Hough.
Franklin A. Hough was a former mayor of Amherstburg from 1907-1909. He had previously practiced law in the area as a junior partner in the practice of Reade & Kirkland. By purchasing Lot 4 from Park & Borrowman, Hough owned not only the former mill but also several brick barracks and earth work bastions that remained from the fort's military days. His intention was to establish a manor-like atmosphere to the property and so was responsible for either demolishing or moving several military buildings off the property. This allowed him to focus on remodeling the mill as a Colonial Revival style building as is recognizable today. From 1918 until 1944, when he died, the house remained a private residence.
In 1946 the Town of Amherstburg sold the property to the Crown to be overseen by Parks Canada and added to the already designated Fort Malden National Historic Site. The house first served as its main museum, but was later remodelled into the Visitor Interpretation Centre in the 1990s because of its size and ability to accommodate large numbers of visitors. In 2014 the Canadian government determined the house should again undergo remodelling in order to structurally stabilize the foundation. Once reopened to the public, the Hough House will again serve as a museum displaying artifacts from the War of 1812 and the Rebellions of 1837-
Sources Amherstburg 1796-1996: The New Town in the Garrison Grounds Volume II, Edited by Don Tupling. Amherstburg: Amherstburg Bicentennial Book Committee, 1997.

“Fort Malden National Historic Park: A Visitor Use Study 1969.” National Parks Service – Planning: National and Historic Parks Branch, no. 42 (1969): 1-6.

Botsford, David P. and Linda Beare. At the End of the Trail. Windsor: Windsor Print & Litho Ltd., 1985.

Carter-Edwards, Dennis. “Fort Malden from 1837-1842.” Research Bulletin National Historic Parks and Sties Branch (Indian and Northern Affairs Parks Canada), no. 65 (1977): 1-9.

Heritage Conversation Program, “Historic Landscape Conservation Study.” Real Property Services Public Works & Government Services Canada, (1997).

Lesperance, Sharon. “1861 Malden Lunatic Asylum, Essex.” OntarioGenWeb’s Census Project. Accessed October 18, 2014, http://ontariocensus.rootsweb.ancestry.com/transcripts/1861/799-1.html.

Marsh, John A. With the Tide: Recollections and Anecdotal Histories of the Town of Amherstburg and the Lower Detroit River District. Amherstburg: Marsh Collection Society Tri-Graphics Brown & Associates, 1995.

Jonathan Brignall (historical interpreter at Fort Malden) in discussion with the author, October 2014.
Photos:
(Click on the image to view at full size)
Hough House Plaque
Hough House Plaque
This image depicts a plaque erected on the west side of the Hough House stating that a Brick Guard House had originally been located in the area of the house in 1821. If one looks behind the plaque the foundation line can be seen that indicates the Guard House[nowiki]'s location. Throughout the Fort's grounds there are several similar plaques indicating excavation sites of original or early Fort buildings. Several of these original military buildings had been demolished or heavily remodeled by Hough in order to appeal to his manor-like vision of Fort Malden'[/nowiki]s grounds.

Statement of Significance
Date Designated 13/2/1994
By-law Number 91-181
Description of Property -pitched gable roof with symmetrical dormers on the front and rear. Much of the house follows more classic designs of the colonial style, such as a slightly projecting front portico that houses a Palladian window. The original hall has a formal, elaborate staircase and interior finishes and trims have all been maintained. However, there are several characteristics that have been altered to suit the more practical requirements of the building as either an interpretation centre or museum. For example, the original panelling on the door and its multi-
Statement of Cultural Heritage Value or Interest 's Scheme once its defense purposes ended. With so many soldiers and thier families living in the town, it could be argued that they provided a steady for local businesses. When the fort remained abandoned prior to the installation of the Asylum, the town of Amherstburg lost one of its major guaranteed business markets. When the Malden branch of the Asylum was created, the town again had a major economic asset in being able to sell local goods competitively. Additionally, as a lumber and planing mill the fort and the Hough House offered employment opportunities for local residents. When Franklin A. Hough purchased the land, he was intending on investing in further land development which he did throughout Amherstburg until his death. Finally, as a nationally recognized heritage site, the fort attracts hundreds of visitors to Amherstburg as tourists. Currently, the fort focuses on promoting local craftsman and businesses by offering the grounds for both historical and arts fairs. As a result, Fort Malden, with the Hough House as the most prominent and recognizable building on the complex, is completely engrained into Amherstburg'
Legal Description (Plan and Lot Number): Part of Lot 4
Sources “Hough House 91-181: Heritage Character Statement.” Federal Heritage Buildings Review Office. Accessed October 18, 2014, http://www.historicplaces.ca/media/15425/1991-181(e)houghhouse.pdf.

“Hough House: Recognized Federal Heritage Building.” Parks Canada. Accessed October 18, 2014, http://www.pc.gc.ca/apps/dfhd/page_fhbro_eng.aspx?id=5557.

Amherstburg 1796-1996: The New Town in the Garrison Grounds Volume II, Edited by Don Tupling. Amherstburg: Amherstburg Bicentennial Book Committee, 1997.

Marsh, John A. With the Tide: Recollections and Anecdotal Histories of the Town of Amherstburg and the Lower Detroit River District. Amherstburg: Marsh Collection Society Tri-Graphics Brown & Associates, 1995.
Media:Canada 1812 at Fort Malden National Historic Site


Fort Malden Virtual Tour


Last updated 2014-11-24 15:29:21.650
Group UofWindsor - Spatial History
Added By K Detting
Date Added October 18, 2014
Last Modified By HRC Admin
Date Last Modified November 24, 2014
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